Net art projects

Indirect Flights

Indirect Flights, a new online work by Joe Hamilton with sound by J.G. Biberkopf and supported by The Moving Museum, is a sprawling landscape of layered images. Raw materials, satellite images, organic textures, brush strokes and architectural fragments are all blended together into a dense panorama extending in all directions. As you pan across the terrain like Google Maps the layers move at different speeds giving the illusion of depth, constantly changing what is hidden and exposed. This shifting composition is an attempt to depict contemporary landscape, in a moment defined by the proliferation of digital technologies and the global transportation of bodies, commodities and goods. Launch Indirect flights

it's doing it / it did it

It’s doing it is an online group exhibition of computer generated images that autonomously updates on a daily basis over the course of 45 days. All of the works in the show are instruction-based artworks expressed through computer programs written by the artists. These programs generate new images once daily that can be viewed on the website. Each instantiation of the show, while being similar to the previous and following ones, is unique, emphasizing the expressive, data-driven, and intelligent possibilities of randomness for art creation in the context of the digital. Previous iterations of each artwork can be seen by changing the date in the top right of this page. Launch this project.


Operation Troll the NSA ain't got nothin' on this cypherpunk application. Carlos Sáez and Anthony Antonellis invite you to fracture your online presence and fry the eyes of Big Brother by oversharing a random sampling of trigger words via email or via social media. You might get gagged and Gitmo'd away from your apartment, but at least you'll have a new follower thanks to

Body Anxiety

Body Anxiety shares the varied perspectives of artists who examine gendered embodiment, performance and self-representation on the internet.

Throughout art and film history, the female body and nude has been an ongoing subject in male-authored work. More often than not, the woman’s body is capitalized on in these works while their voice is muted. From the Seventies onwards, female artists employed video and performance to reclaim their bodies from this art historical trajectory.

Today, artists use the internet as a platform to create and share their own imagery. While appropriation might be a common practice in contemporary art, using the internet as gender-queer performative space allows artists to question contemporary attitudes towards femininity.

In “Body Anxiety” Schrager and Chan have selected a collection of female-empowering artworks to present in one single location in hopes of reshaping pre-existing narrative of gendered appropriation.


Beyond is a mysterious virtual world. In a playful spirit of philosophical inquiry, it explores the paradoxes of technology, desire, and the paranormal posed since the birth of mechanical reproduction; the phonograph severing the voice from the body, photography capturing the soul and cinema resurrecting the dead.

- Drag your mouse to the left or right to move around a panorama.
- To move from one place to another, hover the mouse over different objects. When the cursor changes to a hand, you are over a hot spot.
- Click on a hotspot to explore.

More info here (pdf)

oulipo (Fr. Ouvroir de Litterature Potentielle = Workshop for Potential Literature)

The six works presented in "Oulipoems" range from poems, to poetry games, to tools for writing poetry. They are inspired by the Oulipo movement, a French literary movement which combines writing and mathematics. Members of the Oulipo create works of literature that are governed by rules ("constraints"). For example, all words might have to contain only the vowel 'e' or words might be spelled phonetically. Members of the Ouliopo are also interested in algorithmically generated texts, including, especially, text-generating machines which can result in an infinite, or at least very large, number of different texts.

The Dumpster

The Dumpster is an interactive online visualization that attempts to depict a slice through the romantic lives of American teenagers. Using real postings extracted from millions of online blogs, visitors to the project can surf through tens of thousands of specific romantic relationships in which one person has "dumped" another. The project's graphical tools reveal the astonishing similarities, unique differences, and underlying patterns of these failed relationships, providing both peculiarly analytic and sympathetically intimate perspectives onto the diversity of global romantic pain.

The Dumpster was created by Golan Levin, Kamal Nigam and Jonathan Feinberg and made possible by support from the Whitney Artport, the Tate Online, and Intelliseek. Version 1.0 of the Dumpster was built in Processing and launched on Valentine's day, 2006.


"There was this art website called that had no public access. In February ’99 Rhizome subscribers received an invitation and password to see the new exhibition. During the opening we copied the whole show and published it on our website without restrictions. Our action upset and lead to a cease-and-desist request. While recently ceased to exist, our version remained visible ever since." 0100101110101101.ORG, Copies

Loaded 5x

we are always waiting for the big
event that will change our lives forever --
not to make our lives a paradise,
but to give us direction, to find out what
our mission is, what is worth struggling for.
we are a nation in search of a frontier,
and without one we are overwhelmed
by anxiety.

Loaded 5x


"The pieces on are an attempt to articulate mathematical and natural principles below a visual surface in an enjoyable and sometimes playful way. People should be able to get their own ideas about the pieces and involve themselves without having any preconception of how to watch or how to "use" the pieces - that's why there are no instructions or any guidelines. Depending of the used formulas and also depending on who is watching/playing around, the results of the created images and/or sounds will always be different - in that sense, the user can also be seen as an additional random-factor in the code which can help to create a more or less "organic" result."

// Lia, July 2001