Conservation & retrieval

Lost net-art & retrieval

Since the nineties many net-art projects went obsolete due to link fail, lost services, damaged code, or incompatibility with players/ browsers. Net-art.org aims to collect traces of these lost net-art projects: url's, code, screenshots, user experience, artist statements etc. This digtal archeology project for lost net-art will be exhibited in the Digital Mortuary.

For suggestions or contributions please use the contact form or send an email to pimpeterse[at]net-art.org

CONSERVATION

Anne Laforet is writing her PhD thesis on "The preservation of Net Art in museums. The strategies at work."

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PhD thesis "The preservation of Net Art in museums. The strategies at work."
Anne Laforet
2009
under the direction of Jean Davallon
University of Avignon, France

(text in French - soon available to download under a free license + links + bibliography)

summary : Read more »

WYSOCKA, E. Agatha Re-Appears, net art resoration project

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WYSOCKA, E. Agatha Re-Appears, net art resoration project, 2008
Restoration Project: Olia Lialina’s early net.art piece “Agatha Appears” from the Collection of C³ Center for Culture & Communication Foundation

State of the artwork before the restoration.
Work was originally created for Netscape 4.0 browser in HTML 3.2 language and real audio sound format. Original files have become incompatible with contemporary browsers and work was no longer available in its previous, interactive form.
Due to corruption and disappearance of some files, sections of Agatha's trajectory got lost and so was the original idea of the piece

Read the whole article on INCCA WYSOCKA

Vanishing net-art (introduction to net art restoration)

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Launch project
(1990)
The aim of this essay is to draw restorers' and theorists' attention to the phenomena that exist in virtual space. This should be associated with a very specific type of restoration that unfortunately does not yet exist in practice or exists in its amateur form. This means research related to the restoration of net art (net.art, internet art). It is likely that the significance of this art will increase only at the beginning of the next millennium. A question will arise how to save things that have already lost their form.

The significance of net art security is viewed through the eyes of a restorer in this essay. Based on the realisation that virtual phenomena are intangible, attempts have been made to clarify technical possibilities to preserve this art. Because of this, there have been no efforts to identify the things that should be preserved and things that should be simply rejected.

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Mortuary of lost net-art

This mortuary of net-art displays links to lost net-art projects. Do you know or remember vaguely one of the pieces please leave a comment or submit a url where the piece can be seen.

Discipline number four, Graham Mill=beware the Robots

* Discipline number four, Graham Mill=beware the Robots
http://bull.miletic.info/netfilm/netfilm_5.html

FFF

*Samyn, Michaël en Morlan, Jef. FFF. 1996.
http://www.ping.be/FFF/

Green Room (lost net-art)

*"Laurie Anderson's Green Room." Voyager. 1997.
http://www.voyagerco.com/LA/

My Boyfriend Came Back From the War Action alert

*My Boyfriend Came Back From the War
Action alert, 2000, Florian Schneider (lost)

My Boyfriend Came Back From the War Comics Convention

*My Boyfriend Came Back From the War
Comics Convention, Jacqueline Steck, 2006 (lost)

My Boyfriend Came Back from the War Personal

*My Boyfriend Came Back from the War
Personal, Greg Jones, 2007 (lost)

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My Boyfriend Came Back From the War: critique

*My Boyfriend Came Back From the War
critique / student, circa 1997, Edmund Yu (lost)

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Netartmuseum

Silverserver, Lia

* Silverserver, Lia
Lia works

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DOCUMENTS

Kites & Websites — Evan Roth

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Kites & Websites — Evan Roth

Kites and Websites collects a selection of works developed in the framework of Evan Roth’s Internet Landscapes project, an ongoing investigation into the network, nature and the self. Like a new romantic wanderer, he has studied the global submarine fiber optic cables in various countries, often finding himself alone in remote locations.

POSSIBLE FUTURES: ART, MUSEUMS AND DIGITAL ARCHIVES

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Bilingual edition is dedicated to the discussion of preserving digital memory and culture, bringing together internationally renowned experts of the field of conservation of digital art, collections digitization, database politics and aesthetics

The book Possible Futures: art, museums and digital archives is dedicated to the discussion of preserving digital memory and culture, bringing together internationally renowned experts of the field of conservation of digital art, collections digitization, database politics and aesthetics. It is published by Editora Peirópolis and Edusp and it is available in paperback and ebook editions.

The result of a seminar held at the University of São Paulo in 2012, the work edited by Giselle Beiguelman and Ana Gonçalves Magalhães has articles written by a team of national and international experts addressing issues from the preservation of natively digital art to conservation processes of digitized collections, through the aesthetics that emerge from the databases to the new political and cultural complexity that arises with the era of “amateur archivists” and large “memorizer corporations”, such as Google and Facebook.

Editors: Giselle Beiguelman, Ana Gonçalves Magalhães Read more »

Owning Online Art: selling and collecting netbased artwork

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As an application oriented research project, Owning Online Art (OOA), selling and collecting netbased artwork (url) investigated requirements for the integration of web-based art into the art market. The business partners envisioned the foundation of a gallery for web-based media art: package deal was intended to prove the sales merit of web-based works by the detailed definition of the individual artistic work and by contractual agreements concerning their maintenance and use on the part of the buyers. The retaining of purchase commissions and grant commissions is due to the conservation effort that is often difficult to estimate in advance in view of technological advances as well as a value philosophy which continues to prize the idea of the unique specimen, and therefore the exclusive claim of ownership.

The research project Owning Online Art – Study for a Netart Gallery of the UAS Northwestern Switzerland, Academy of Art and Design was funded by the Kommission für Technologie und Innovation (KTI). This publication was supported by the UAS Northwestern Switzerland, Academy of Art and Design, the Christoph Merian Foundation und the Migros Kulturprozent.

Networking, The Net as Artwork

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Networking, The Net as Artwork(pdf) by Tatiana Bazzichelli, Preface by Derrick de Kerckhove

"The concept that networking is art is loaded with meaning, since it unites two seemingly different worlds: the practices of networking with that of art. In this context, however, the two are perfectly integrated. To network means to create relationship networks, in order to share experiences and ideas in the context of a communicative exchange, and an artistic experimentation in which the sender and the receiver, the artist and the public, act on the same plane."

From Browser to Gallery (and Back): The Commodification of Net Art

From Browser to Gallery (and Back): The Commodification of Net Art 1990-2011
by Jennifer Chan, Advised by Professor Chris Hanson, Syracuse University Special thanks to jOnCates and Curt Cloninger September 2011-January 2012
Since its beginnings in the late 90s, internet art has had a fickle relationship with the museum. While commissions and granting initiatives have
been established for media arts in Europe and America, the relationship between internet art and its fluctuating appearance in institutions demonstrates that it has not yet been wholly embraced by mainstream contemporary art. Due to its variable reproducibility, the curation and collection of net art has presented challenges and transformations to the traditional operations of art distribution. Sculptures, digital paintings, installations and performances appear on the internet as documentation of art, whilst animated gifs and videos are moving images that require browsers, screens or projections as the apparatus for (re)presentation. This essay traces the shifts in value of internet art from browser
to gallery, and compares disparate examples of curation, collection and selling of net art from past and present. Some questions that started this inquiry were:
• Can internet art make money like other artistic genres?
• Who buys internet art? Read more »

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